The Good, Bad, and Ugly!

 

The Good, Bad, and Ugly!
In recent years, the consumption of carbonated soft drinks and sweetened and flavored beverages have increased dramatically, and with it the prevalence of dental erosion! The acid added to drinks to balance sugar sweetness and give a tangy taste can cause irreversible loss of tooth structure. This damage occurs with drinks with a pH ( acid) value below 4.0
A recent study surveyed 379 beverages in Birmingham area and 93% had pH levels erosive to your teeth… ask us about details when you are in! Ask us about it on your next visit!

 

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Posted in Oral Health

How does your toothpaste measure up?

How does your toothpaste measure up?
RDA Abrasiveness:
0-70 Low
70-100 Medium
100-150 High
150-250 Regarded as harmful limit (FDA limit=200, ADA limit=250)
Everyone wants brighter and whiter
teeth. Many of today’s toothpaste are
promoted not only for cavity prevention
but also for surface stain removal and
brightening your teeth. These toothpaste
can vary greatly in abrasiveness – doing
more than removing stain, possibly
damaging your enamel or porcelain
work in place, or increasing sensitivity.
Toothpaste abrasiveness is measured by
The Relative Dentin Abrasivity (RDA).
The table below indicates ranges to be
aware of in products on the market.
While all products fall under the FDA
and ADA recommended limits, you will
find a broad range of values. Inquire in
the office for a more extensive list and
what ranges might be best for you.

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Posted in Oral Health

How Sweet it is….

 

Could a sweetener, equal in taste and volume to sugar,
prevent cavities? Xylitol is a sugar alcohol (similar to
sorbitol or mannitol- often found in sugarless products)
that has been shown to have decay-preventive qualities.
Xylitol cannot be used by decay- causing bacteria to grow.
Over time, the exposure to xylitol causes a reduction inXYLITOL-1
the number of these bacteria that survive on the tooth
surface, subsequently reducing the plaque levels and
levels of acid damaging teeth.
It is most often found in mints and chewing gum,
sometimes in combination with sorbitol or mannitol. If
it is listed as the first ingredient, it generally contains the
amount needed to reach decay preventing levels. Ideally,
look for products that contain xylitol only.
Daily intake of 5 grams is optimal. The
amount of xylitol in a product may vary,
affecting frequency needed to reach these
optimal levels. Exposure time should also
be maximized- chewing gum for at least 5
minutes and giving mints time to dissolve.
Xylitol shows great promise as an
important tool to help patients with an
increased risk for cavities, particularly for
those with a dry mouth.
Products can be found in
health food stores and
through the internet.
Could a sweetener, equal in taste and volume to sugar,
prevent cavities? Xylitol is a sugar alcohol (similar to
sorbitol or mannitol- often found in sugarless products)
that has been shown to have decay-preventive qualities.
Xylitol cannot be used by decay- causing bacteria to grow.
Over time, the exposure to xylitol causes a reduction in
the number of these bacteria that survive on the tooth
surface, subsequently reducing the plaque levels and
levels of acid damaging teeth.
It is most often found in mints and chewing gum,
sometimes in combination with sorbitol or mannitol. If
it is listed as the first ingredient, it generally contains the
amount needed to reach decay preventing levels. Ideally,
look for products that contain xylitol only.
Daily intake of 5 grams is optimal. The
amount of xylitol in a product may vary,
affecting frequency needed to reach these
optimal levels. Exposure time should also
be maximized- chewing gum for at least 5
minutes and giving mints time to dissolve.
Xylitol shows great promise as an
important tool to help patients with an
increased risk for cavities, particularly for
those with a dry mouth.
Products can be found in
health food stores and
through the internet.
Could a sweetener, equal in taste and volume to sugar,
prevent cavities? Xylitol is a sugar alcohol (similar to
sorbitol or mannitol often found in sugarless products)
that has been shown to have decay-preventive qualities.
Xylitol cannot be used by decay- causing bacteria to grow.
Over time, the exposure to xylitol causes a reduction in
the number of these bacteria that survive on the tooth
surface, subsequently reducing the plaque levels and
levels of acid damaging teeth.
It is most often found in mints and chewing gum,
sometimes in combination with sorbitol or mannitol. If
it is listed as the first ingredient, it generally contains the
amount needed to reach decay preventing levels. Ideally,
look for products that contain xylitol only.
Daily intake of 5 grams is optimal. The
amount of xylitol in a product may vary,
affecting frequency needed to reach these
optimal levels. Exposure time should also
be maximized- chewing gum for at least 5
minutes and giving mints time to dissolve.
Xylitol shows great promise as an
important tool to help patients with an
increased risk for cavities, particularly for
those with a dry mouth.
Products can be found in
health food stores and
through the internet.

Posted in Oral Health

The Good, Bad, and Ugly!

The Good, Bad, and Ugly!
In recent years, the consumption of carbonated soft drinks and sweetened and flavored beverages have increased dramatically, and with it the prevalence of dental erosion! The acid added to drinks to balance sugar sweetness and give a tangy taste can cause irreversible loss of tooth structure. This damage occurs with drinks with a pH ( acid) value below 4.0
A recent study surveyed 379 beverages in Birmingham area and 93% had pH levels erosive to your teeth..ask us about details when you are in! Ask us about it on your next visit!

Posted in Oral Health

Welcome to our Ask the Dentist blog!

We invite our patients, family and friends to visit our Ask the Dentist page frequently where we will post updates on common questions and relevant dental information to help you keep your smile healthy!

Posted in About Us

HOW CAN MY ORAL HEALTH AFFECT MY OVERALL HEALTH?

The extent to which problems in your mouth can reflect or affect problems elsewhere in the body has become an issue of increasing concern. Studies have shown an association with heart disease, strokes, diabetes, and low birth weight babies to gum disease or oral infections. Signs of HIV infections or osteoporosis may also first appear in the oral region. Studies continue to determine the extent of the correlation between these findings. Preventative dental visits should routinely include oral cancer screenings and evaluations of soft tissue and gums for any changes.

Posted in Oral Health | Tagged

It’s not just a cleaning

Don’t underestimate your regular dental cleaning with your hygienist! This visit is important to maintain your oral health. Oral cancer screenings should be a regular part of this exam, and early detection is a critical key. Periodontal evaluations also prove important in determining if signs of gum disease are present and treatment indicated to address those. Periodontal disease is also correlated to various other systemic concerns, and therapy will potentially benefit overall health as well. Thorough exam of existing restorations and xrays also reveal early changes and minimize treatment and avoid emergencies!

Posted in Oral Health